Monday, July 23, 2012

Hunger, Heat and Inundation


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Two articles in today's paper are too important and persuasive to ignore, especially since their messages are ominously tied together, giving this BLOG writer the
responsibiliy to comment.


Point no.1: 
Corporate America, especially our banks (G-Sachs, JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup and Wells Fargo) are growing far too large, are far too dominant and all but untouchable by well-intended government regulation.

Point no. 2:
Climate change, ignored, denied or rejected by the most the powerful forces in our country (Exxon and the Koch Brothers are cited as well as many Republicans) gives us about a decade to shape up.  Drought and searing heat is just one part.  The temperature changes and the rise of the oceans (Good-bye Florida and NYC!), the Plastic Garbage Patch in the Western Pacific, the death of the reefs. The list goes on.


My point: It is obviously time to re-cast, re-shoot and update that old 1973 film, Soylant Green, directed by Richard Fleischer. The film, which is loosely based upon the 1966 science fiction novel Make Room! Make Room!, by Harry Harrison, won the Nebula Award for Best Dramatic Presentation and the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film in 1973.


In this uneven but relentlessly disturbing story, corporations take over the sources of food production and distribution, people are herded and contained, the heat is unabated, drinking water is scarce and fresh apples are unknown.  This is not communism, but insane capitalism. seeking power.  A small, elite stratum of the wealthy survive in luxury; the masses squirm, confused,many unable to even recall when life was better.

In the original film  (and the 1966 sci-fi novel on which it's based, Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Hanson),  women become property ("furniture"), libraries and other information sources are limited or unavailable, and the corpses of the deceased are made into cookies.  

Fleischer's version was not nearly sinister enough and the 1970s were ...well, the 1970s.


The companion to this film, of course, is Blade Runner.

Ridley Scott: Get to it!


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